Category: Auto Loans

What Is the Average Used Car Loan Rate?

by Phillip Warren

average-used-car-loan-rate

Article originally published July 13th, 2016. Updated October 30th, 2018.

More people are opting to lease their new set of wheels instead of purchasing them, according to Q2 2018 data from Experian.

The number of auto loans grew to an all-time high, with leasing surpassed 30% of all new consumer vehicle sales. But the interest rates consumers are getting on these loans has stayed low, especially for used cars. In fact, Experian reported that average loan rates saw some increases, but still remain historically low.

Loan rates for a new car in Q2 of 2018 were 5.76%, up from 5.20% a year prior. Franchise used rates are 8.28% (down from 7.88% in Q2 2017), while independently used rates are 11.87% (down only 0.17% from Q2 2018).

The Experian Automotive scoring deems prime consumers as those with scores of 661 to 850, nonprime users with scores of 601 to 660, and subprime users as those with scores of 300 to 600. Consumers on all risk tiers are increasingly choosing to lease over purchasing cars, according to the report.

The number of prime consumers choosing used vehicles increased from 55.61% in Q2 2016 to 55.79% in Q2 2018. The number of nonprime and subprime consumers also saw increases, from 21.75% to 22.05% and decreases of 25.71% to 25.05%, respectively.

Experian reported that the increased number of prime consumers choosing used vehicles resulted in “score increases, greater percentages of used financing in the prime risk tier and lower average used rates.”

Getting a Car Loan

If you’re thinking about buying a used car and taking out an auto loan to do it, it’s a good idea to review your credit first. Having a good credit score can help you qualify for better terms and conditions on your financing. (To find out where your credit stands, you can see two of your credit scores for free, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

And when you’re figuring out how much you can afford, remember to consider not only how much your monthly car payment will be but also how much the loan will cost you in the end, by considering the interest rate and length of the loan term. (The longer the loan term, the more interest you will pay.)

If you aren’t happy with what you see, don’t worry — you may be able to improve your credit scores by paying down any big credit card balances, disputing errors and limiting credit inquiries until your score has had time to rebound.

Gather All Documentation

When attempting to get a used car loan, you will want to gather all the necessary documentation including the following:

  • Your Driver’s License
  • Proof of all of your income- this can be a paycheck stub or even a tax return
  • A utility or phone bill to prove your residency
  • Your social security number so they can run your credit check

These days, you can often apply for the used car loan right online or even by phone which makes it the process that much easier and accessible.

Start With Your Own Banking Institution

It is always a good idea to start with your own bank or credit union for financing because you have already established history and relationship with them. Typically, you will be able to find the absolute best rates and more favorable terms if you go through your own bank.

They will also be able to advise you on all the options that are available to you as you begin the journey toward car ownership.

Shop for the Best Rates

You never want to settle on the first rate you are given; don’t be afraid to shop around to see if you can find something better than the typical auto loan rates. You will find the best auto loan rates if you have good credit. Additionally, if you apply for multiple loans within a 14 day period, it will only count as one hard inquiry so that you can find the best rate possible.

What is the Average Used Car Loan Rate?

Typically, you will find that the car loan rate on a used car is going to be a bit higher than the rates you would find with a newer car. For example, good credit car loans can see an interest rate as low as 3.9% for a newer model and a little more than 5% for its older version.

Average Auto Loan Rates by Credit Score

The following are the average rates you may find for a used car loan that carries a 60-month repayment term based on a range of different FICO Scores.

With a credit score between 500 and 589, you may be looking at interest rates on the loan as high as 16%. A bad credit score also makes it a lot harder to get approved for the car loan initially as well.

A credit score in between 590 and 619 will typically see the 15% mark, and the percentages get lower from here with the lowest coming in at 4.39% with a credit score between a 720 and 850.

A longer loan term will usually mean you will have a lower monthly payment, but you will also accrue more in interest with a longer loan term.

Bottom Line

When determining the average used car loan rate and the amount of interest you may have to pay on a loan, you will want to check all three of your credit reports, examine your credit score and credit history and determine what steps you can take to improve your credit, so you can qualify for a lower interest rate.

Again, if you bank with a credit union, always start there first because the lender will already be able to see if you are high risk or not. Car buyers should always take their time, do their research, and tackle the work of fixing their credit prior to obtaining a loan for a car. It is always best to shop smarter and save money in the long run.

The post What Is the Average Used Car Loan Rate? appeared first on Credit.com.


Source: credit.com

How to Get Rid of Mice in Your Apartment

by Phillip Warren

Got mice?

If these pesky pests are in your apartment, we've got solutions. While it makes good sense to keep them out in the first place, we get it, stuff happens. The number one thing you should do is speak to your leasing office maintenance crew or landlord. Let them know you need pest control right away! Hopefully they will send in a professional company to rid you of the problem.

But you can also be proactive and takes steps to oust the intruders. You should know that mice live in groups. So, when you see one mouse, you probably have five, six or more squatters.

That's a problem because mice can contaminate food and food preparation surfaces, which can lead to potential health issues.

Leave pesticides to the professionals

You might think that pesticides are the way to go to get rid of mice. But according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), that's only a good idea if you're a pro. This is not a DIY project.

Improper use of pesticides could be toxic to both people and pets, and people with compromised immune systems can be especially vulnerable to improper use of pesticides.

Here's what you can do to rid your home of furry unwanted irritants scurrying across the floor and more.

1. Use traps

If you're not squeamish interacting with a dead mouse, then try the old-school method. Terminix recommends baiting the trap with peanut butter, bacon, chocolate, dried fruit or oatmeal. Another option is a glue trap.

Or, you can try something more modern. There are actually traps that use high voltage to shock the mouse. It might sound cruel, but since it happens quickly, there's no suffering. How does it work? The bait station is in the back of the unit. The mouse enters the trap and triggers a sensor. That's when a high voltage electric current electrocutes the mouse in seconds.

Alternatively, catch-and-release traps are a humane option. When you trap a mouse, you can release it far from where you live.

2. Seal-off floor and wall gaps

mouse hole

If you see an opening where wires and conduits are in your apartment, those could be road maps for vermin. Mice can enter a building or home through the smallest opening or crack.

Plug up even the tiniest holes, even the ones the size of a nickel! Mice commonly move through walls, ceilings, floors and even cabinets.

3. Your in-house mouser superheroes

The furry pet you want in your house just might solve your mouse problem. If they're up for it. Your cat is your live-in pest control agent. Some dogs can take on the task of de-mousing with vigor, too.

Mice love pet food. So, if you leave it out for your pet, that's likely where your cat or dog will find the pest, nibbling away on his or her food.

4. All-natural repellents

Here's a natural way to repel the critters as a preventive measure from the start. There are various mice repellents on the market that contain no chemicals and are also pet-friendly.

Ingredients matter, so look for the ones that have peppermint essential oil or balsam fir oil. These specific fragrances cause mice to find the closest exit. Humane and effective, you can find this option as a spray repellent or in sachet or pouch form.

5. Keep food sealed in the pantry

sealed food

Mice are in search of food. If you have a mouse problem, be sure that your food is safely sealed. Keep it out of the sight or smell of any mouse traipsing through your house. This means investing in airtight food canisters.

If there's a package that's ripped or open, remember that annoying mice can squeeze into even the tiniest opening in a bag or box of food.

Don't do it all yourself

To help keep mice out of your apartment, have a list of what needs to be done to have a mouse-free home. The EPA recommends that you check your plumbing. Cover gaps and seals around sills, sewer lines and other spots they could squeeze into.

Ask the maintenance team in your apartment complex to do the hard stuff. This includes using caulk, knitted copper mesh, steel wool or foam insulation to block access around pipe openings.

The post How to Get Rid of Mice in Your Apartment appeared first on Apartment Living Tips - Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.


Source: apartmentguide.com

What to Do Before You Lease a Car

by Phillip Warren

A smiling woman hands a man the keys to a car he just successfully leased

Getting a new car is a big decision, and you should choose your next vehicle carefully. But if you think finding the right car is difficult, deciding whether to lease or buy can be even more overwhelming. Start the process right by understanding the minimum credit score to lease a car and determining whether this is the best decision for you.

1. Check Your Credit

According to Experian, companies that lease automobiles typically like to see a credit score of 700 or higher, though you might be able to get approved for some leases with a score that falls below that. In some cases, it’s easier to qualify for a lease for certain vehicles, such as those that come with a lower price tag.

Before you apply for a lease, you should check your credit report, giving yourself plenty of time to dispute and fix any negative mistakes to enhance your chance of getting approved for a lease. You can get a copy of your credit report from AnnualCreditReport.com. Usually you get one copy per year from each of the three major bureaus, but due to COVID-19, you can get one copy every week through April 2021.

You should also check your credit score to check if you have the right credit score to lease a car. This lets you know if you fall below the potential requirements for most lease companies. Sign up for ExtraCredit and get 28 of your FICO Scores plus your credit reports from all three credit bureaus so you’re armed with the right information.

2. Make Sure a Lease Is Right for You

Leases offer some advantages over buying. The down payment and fixed monthly payments for a lease are typically lower than the cost of financing. You get to drive a newer car, and many repair costs may be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty or the lease agreement.

However, leases also come with many limitations and the potential for additional costs. If you exceed a lease’s mileage limit, you’ll pay a fee for every additional mile. You’ll also be charged for extra wear and tear, and you aren’t allowed to modify the vehicle. If you decide the car isn’t right for you, you could pay a steep penalty for terminating your lease early.

Despite the lower monthly payment, the lifetime cost of leasing is generally much higher than buying, especially considering you don’t own your car at the end of the lease. Before you decide if a lease is right for you, make sure to understand the pros and cons of leasing.

3. Know What You Can Afford

One of the biggest advantages of leasing is that you might get a lower monthly payment compared to a car loan on the same vehicle. Leases are cheaper because you’re only paying for the depreciation of the car’s value plus interest, taxes, and fees. With a loan, you’re also paying off the entire purchase price of the vehicle.

However, these monthly costs don’t take down payments or trade-in values into account. While leases typically have lower down payments, you’ll have to turn in or buy your car when the lease is up. And you’ll have no ownership in the car to show for the few years of payments you already made. It’s important to consider whether you can afford the monthly payment now and the cost of buying or leasing a new vehicle in a few years.

4. Shop Around for a Car and a Lease

Auto loans can be found at banks, credit unions, car dealers, and online. Leases, on the other hand, are largely controlled by the manufacturer. You may be able to get a better deal if you consider vehicles from different manufacturers instead of sticking to one make and model.

The manufacturer will consider your credit score to lease a car, your debt-to-income ratio, and the “lease-to-value” ratio. That’s how much you are financing compared to the vehicle’s value. If you are having trouble qualifying, you may need to put down additional money or get a cosigner for your lease.

Just as with auto loans, you can negotiate the cost of a leased car. So if you aren’t getting the deal you want, make a counter-offer or keep looking.

Not Ready to Lease?

If you aren’t ready to commit to a lease term of two to three years, you can potentially take over the remaining term on someone else’s lease. As long as your credit is in the same tier or better than the person whose lease you are assuming, you’ll likely qualify to take over their lease. Sites like SwapALease.com and LeaseTrader.com help connect consumers who want to get out of leases and consumers who want to assume one.

If you’d rather buy a car than lease one, we’ve got some tips on how to finance a car. We can also help you find a lender to apply for a car loan.


The post What to Do Before You Lease a Car appeared first on Credit.com.


Source: credit.com

What Items Should You Put in a Fire Safe Box

by Phillip Warren

If a fire happens, will your important documents stay safe?

Apartment dwellers need to be proactive about protecting critical information in case of a fire. Plenty of us have gone digital when it comes to storage of personal information, but certain items still need to come in hard copies. And some things, other than papers, also need a tangible safe place.

The safety deposit box at the local bank is still an option. However, bank hours aren't always aligned with yours. If you want to go the digital route, look for companies that specialize in the storage of critical data. You can access your info directly from your phone, tablet or Amazon's Alexa device. But if you prefer to go more old school — you need to think about protecting your valuables that are difficult to replace.

What will you need easy access to when you're in an emergency fire crisis? Your list will probably look like this: an original birth certificate, social security card, insurance papers and car titles and other original docs. You could also include spare keys, passports and irreplaceable items like heirloom jewelry. A fireproof safe box will give you peace of mind. And, it will act as a security measure should a fire occur.

Are all fire safe boxes the same?

Did you know that not all fire safe boxes are alike? For example, standard fireproof safes protect your valuables against intense heat and smoke damage for periods of up to 120 minutes, according to Western Safe, while others can withstand the heat for longer. So, what's the best type of fireproof box? Experts say it all depends on what you intend to store.

You should look for a fire safe box that has emergency override keys so you can open it up even if you forget the passcode. The keys are also good if the batteries run out on the keypad.

To help you know what things to keep in a fire safe box in your apartment, we've organized a list. These items make good sense to safeguard against fire:

  • Critical documents: Store your checking and savings account bank books, birth certificates, social security cards, wills and passports in a fire safe box. If you need to get out at a moment's notice, these important documents will be safe and accessible.
  • Digital media: Your digital must-haves include USB sticks, memory cards and CDs. These items are your physical back-up. And this is especially true if you don't want your most private data to live on remote servers.
  • Insurance policies: Talk to your insurance company about your renters insurance following the fire. Having access right away to your policy will help you to take action post-fire.
  • Cash: Life today is debit and credit card-driven. But it's also smart to keep a stash of small bills on hand. If an emergency calls for quick cash, you'll be glad you thought ahead and put some aside.
  • Other valuables: Remember to organize a file with essential information. Include emergency numbers of family members. Have your prescriptions, who your family doctor is and contact info for your pet's vet, too.

apartment fire

Do your homework

Before purchasing a fire safe box, be sure to research what's on the market. You'll be surprised to find a range of choices. You can even select from fireproof safes that you can bolt to the ground or wall. Is the fire safe box waterproof? If not, be sure to protect all contents by storing them in plastic.

An official fire rating from the Underwriters Laboratory comes with all safes, according to Haven Life. The rating lets you know what temperature the fire safe box will stay inside during a fire. It will also let you know how long it will stay at that temperature.

Look for fire safe boxes that are either 125 degrees Fahrenheit or 325-degrees safe. They typically come with up to three hours' worth of protection. Spruce reports that some fire safe boxes can withstand fires with temperatures up to 1,550 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes.

Does size matter?

Fire safe boxes are compact to mid-size and come in a range to meet your needs. You can find options with a capacity of 0.17 cubic feet and weighing in at just 14 pounds. Or, one that weighs a little less than 28 pounds and can store flat 8-1/2-by-11-inch, letter-sized documents.

Extra-large capacity fire boxes can hold much more. They can weigh more than 100 pounds and measure more than 1-1/2-feet on each side. But the size is worth it because it gives your stuff a greater chance of surviving a disaster, according to Wirecutter. The site recommends a fire safe box the size of a mini-fridge that weighs in at 56 pounds.

Choose a fire safe box that has all the protective features and benefits to keep your important documents safe. In the long run, the investment could prove to be a wise one.

The post What Items Should You Put in a Fire Safe Box appeared first on Apartment Living Tips - Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.


Source: apartmentguide.com