Category: Credit Repair

Does Paying the Minimum Hurt Your Credit Score

by Phillip Warren

Credit card bills can be confusing. If everything was straightforward and clear, credit card debt wouldn’t be such a big issue. But it’s not clear, and debt is a massive issue for millions of consumers. 

One of the most confusing aspects is the minimum payment, with few consumers understanding how this works, how much damage (if any) it does to their credit score, and why it’s important to pay more than the minimum.

We’ll address all of those things and more in this guide, looking at how minimum credit card payments can impact your FICO score and your credit report.

What is a Credit Card Minimum Payment?

The minimum payment is the lowest amount you need to pay during any given month. It’s often fixed as a fraction of your total balance and includes fees and interest.  

If you fail to make this minimum payment, you may be hit with late fees and if you still haven’t paid after 30 days, your creditor will report your activity to the major credit bureaus and your credit score will take a hit.

When this happens, you could lose up to 100 points and gain a derogatory mark that remains on your credit report for up to 7 years. Making minimum payments will not result in a derogatory mark, but it can indirectly affect your credit score and we’ll discuss that a little later.

Firstly, it’s important to understand why you’re being asked to pay a minimum amount and how you can avoid it.

How Much is a Minimum Credit Card Payment?

Prior to 2004, monthly payments could be as low as 2% of the balance. This caused all kinds of problems as most of your monthly payment is interest and will, therefore, inflate every month so that every time you reduce the balance it grows back. 

Regulators forced a change when they realized that some users were being locked into a cycle of credit card debt, one that could see them repaying thousands more than the balance and taking many years to repay in full.

These days, a minimum payment must be at least 1% of the balance plus all interest and fees that have accumulated during that month, ensuring the balance decreases by at least 1% if only the minimum payment is met.

Do I Need to Make the Minimum Payment?

If you have a rolling balance, you need to make the minimum monthly payment to avoid derogatory marks. If you fail to do so and keep missing those payments, your account will eventually default and cause all kinds of issues.

However, you can avoid the minimum payment by clearing your balance in full.

Let’s assume that you have a brand-new credit card and you spend $2,000 in the first billing cycle. In the next cycle, you will be required to pay this balance in full. However, you will also be offered a minimum payment, which will likely be anywhere from $30 to $100. If this is all that you pay, the issuer will start charging you interest on your balance and your problems will begin.

If you spend $2,000 in the next billing cycle, you have just doubled your debt (minus whatever principal the minimum payment cleared) and your problems.

This is a cycle that many consumers get locked into. They do what they can to pay off their balance in full, but then they have a difficult month and that minimum payment begins to look very tempting. They convince themselves that one month won’t hurt and they’ll repay the balance in full next month, but by that point they’ve spent more, it has grown more, and they just don’t have the funds.

To avoid falling into this trap, try the following tips:

  • Only Spend What You Have: A credit card should be used to spend money you have now or will have in the future. Don’t spend in the hope you’ll somehow come into some money before the billing period ends and the credit card balance rolls over.
  • Get an Introductory Interest Rate: Many credit card issuers offer a 0% intro APR for a fixed period of time, allowing you to accumulate debt without interest. This can help if you need to make some essential purchases, but it’s important not to abuse this as you’ll still need to clear the full balance before the intro period ends.
  • Use a Balance Transfer: If you’re in too deep and the intro rate is coming to an end, consider a balance transfer credit card. These cards allow you to move your full balance from one card (or cards) to another, taking advantage of yet another 0% APR and essentially extending the one you have.
  • Pay the Minimum: If you can’t pay the balance in full, make sure you at least pay the minimum. A missed payment or late payment can incur fees and may hurt your credit score. 

Why Pay More Than the Minimum?

You may have heard experts recommending that you pay more than the minimum every month, but why? If you’re locked into a cycle of credit card debt, it can seem counterproductive. After all, if you have a debt of $10,000 that’s costing you $400 a month, what’s the point of taking an extra $100 out of your budget?

Your interest and fees are covered by your minimum payment and account for a sizeable percentage of that minimum payment. By adding just 50% more, you could be doubling and even tripling the amount of the principal that you repay every month.

What’s more, your interest accumulates every single day and this interest compounds. Imagine, for instance, that you have a balance of $10,000 today and with interest, this grows to $10,040. The next day, the interest will be calculated based on that $10,040 figure, which means it could grow to $10,081, which will then become the new balance for the next day. 

This continues every single day, and the larger your balance is, the more interest will compound and the greater the amount will be due over the term. By paying more than your minimum payment when you can, you’re reducing the balance and slowing things down.

Does Paying the Minimum Hurt My Credit Score?

Paying the minimum amount every month ensures you are doing the bare minimum to avoid hurting your credit history or accumulating fees. However, it can indirectly reduce your score via your credit utilization ratio.

Your credit utilization ratio is a score that compares the credit limit of all available credit cards to the total debt on those cards. It accounts for 30% of your credit score and is, therefore, a very important aspect of the credit scoring process.

The more credit card debt you accumulate, the lower your credit utilization rate will be and the more your score will be impacted. If you only pay the minimum, this rate will become stagnant and may take years to improve. By increasing the payment amount, however, you can bring that ratio down and improve your credit score.

You can calculate your credit utilization score by adding together the total amount of credit limits and debts and then comparing the latter to the former. A combined credit limit of $10,000 and a balance of $5,000, for instance, would equate to a 50% ratio, which is on the high side.

Can Credit Card Fees Hurt My Credit Score?

As with interest charges, credit card fees will not directly reduce your score but may have an indirect effect. Cash advance fees, for instance, can be substantial, with many credit card companies (including Capital One) charging 3% with a $10 minimum charge. This means that every time you withdraw cash, you’re paying at least $10, even if you’re only withdrawing $10.

What many consumers don’t realize is that these fees are also charged every time you buy casino chips or pay for some other form of gambling, and every time you purchase money orders and other cash products. 

Along with foreign transaction fees and penalty fees, these can increase your balance and your minimum payment, making it harder to make on time payments and thus increasing the risk of a late payment.

Does Paying the Minimum Hurt Your Credit Score is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.


Source: pocketyourdollars.com

How to Build a Photo Scanning and Digitizing Side Gig

by Phillip Warren

As simple as it sounds — and actually is — most people are overwhelmed by the thought of taking hundreds or even thousands of photos and organizing them into searchable, digital files.

Then there are the videos filmed on various versions of clunky cameras over the decades.

Perhaps the most daunting version of unorganized photographic memories are slides. Once the butt of so many jokes about boring dinner parties, now they are covered in dust with no hope of ever seeing the light of a projector again.

Well, anyone armed with a $229 scanner and a computer can make searchable digital files of photos and slides. To turn videos into digital files, it takes the original camera they were filmed with or a VCR, an $87 adapter and a computer.

Here’s how to make photo scanning and digitizing your new side hustle.

Five years ago, professional photo curator Sabrina Hughes decided she could make a business out of helping people organize their photos, videos and slides. Her company, PhotoXO, has a compelling slogan: “Show your photos the love they deserve.”

Her years as a photographer, plus a graduate degree in art history and experience as a curatorial assistant at the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, Fla., combine to make her an astute photo archivist. But all of this expertise and experience is not required.

“There’s a certain point when I’m not doing anything you can’t figure out on your own,” she said. “A college student or really anyone could do this to make extra money.”

Hughes offers a self-paced online class called Disaster to Done for $297, which includes lifetime access to course materials. But she’s also sharing her tips with The Penny Hoarder.

Get the Right Equipment

  • Scanner. There are hundreds of scanners out there, but she prefers the Epson v600, which sells for $229.
  • Video adapter. Hughes uses the Elgato Video Capture for digitizing VHS tapes. It can be bought online for $87.
  • Storage. “When I first started out, I was giving everything back on hard drives,” Hughes said. “I was trying to get away from DVDs, since most computers don’t even play those anymore.” She then offered flash drives filled with the photos. Though they are also becoming less common, this is still probably the best tool for beginners. Hughes now uploads everything to her website, which offers permanent storage.
  • Software. Hughes uses Adobe Lightroom ($119), which enables her to label photos so they can be searched and has photo editing functions. Software isn’t required to organize unlabeled photos into folders, however.
A stack of old black and white photographs sits on a person's desk.

Develop and Perfect Your Process

The first step to starting your photo scanning business is setting aside a space in your home. It can be as small as a corner of your bedroom or a desktop if an actual office or spare room isn’t possible.

Next, create a storage system for clients’ photos and video tapes while your work is in progress. Of course clear boxes that stack are great, but they come with a cost. Cardboard shipping boxes work just as well. Place white adhesive labels on the ends with the name of the client and the date the work started. You can place new labels over these when one project is done and the next client’s photos go into the boxes.

To digitize photos and slides, scan each one with the scanner to upload it to your computer. Make files for certain years or topics such as “1970s beach trips” or “kids’ birthday parties.” Drag and drop the photos into the appropriate file.

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Deciding What to Charge

It’s smart to charge by the hour when you start out, and give an estimate of how long the project will take.

Determine ahead of time how many photos you can scan in an hour. If you are sorting and scanning, that may be harder to estimate, but it probably adds another 30 minutes onto each hour of scanning. Say you can scan 40 photos an hour, then it would take you five hours to digitize 200 photos that don’t require sorting.

A high schooler or college student might charge $30 to $50 an hour, or approximately $150 to $250 for 200 photos. Allow an extra hour for computer glitches, labeling files and calling the client with questions.

A woman looks off into the distance toward a window with an old photograph on a television screen behind her.

Hughes started out charging by the hour, but found clients were spending so much time “pre-organizing” their photos themselves to save money, it would take them six months or more before they were finally ready for her to start archiving. So she switched to a flat fee of $2,222 for unlimited archiving of slides, photos or videos. To do all three formats, she charges $7,777. She also offers small projects a-la-carte based on the amount of work.

How to Attract Clients

You might have to offer to digitize photos for one or two friends at no cost first to get an idea of how long the process takes and what you will charge.

Then spread the word on social media. Give an estimated price of how many photos you can do for a certain price. Ask your early clients to share something about how wonderful it feels to finally have photos organized and saved forever.

Digitized photos make a great Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or Christmas gift. Promote your business online and in emails during these times and throughout the year.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.


Source: thepennyhoarder.com

By: Jeanine Skowronski

by Phillip Warren

It depends on the terms of the judgment. Usually the judgment will specify how much the creditor/collector can garnish or seize.

Thanks,

Jeanine


Source: credit.com

How Late Can You Be on a Car Payment, Mortgage or Other Bill?

by Phillip Warren

A man sits on a chair, looking concerned.

It’s always frustrating to come across a bill and realize it was due yesterday—or last week. If you’re late on a payment or if you miss it completely, you could end up paying late fees and taking a hit on your credit score. It can be especially difficult if you want to apply for a loan or credit and are about to make a big purchase like a house or a vehicle.

If you’re a reliable customer and have only missed this one payment, it likely shouldn’t be a big problem, and you can probably avoid a late fee. But if you wait too long, it might not be possible.

Either way, we’re going to help answer some of your biggest questions:

  • How late can you be on a car payment before it affects your credit?
  • Is there a late car payment grace period?
  • What about for rent?
  • What happens if you miss a payment completely?
  • Who should you notify?
  • How will it impact your credit score?

Read on to learn how late a credit card or car payment can be before it affects your credit score and what to do if it does.

How Late Can a Credit Card Payment Be?

People often wonder how late a payment has to be before their creditors report it to the credit bureaus. A credit card payment is considered late if it’s received after the cutoff time in your credit card agreement or if the payment submitted is less than the minimum amount due.

Missed credit card payments are generally added to your credit report when the payment is more than 30 days late. This same entry is updated if your payment is 60 days late, and then 90 days. It is important to know what your specific credit card issuer’s policies are, so you can know what to expect.

Keep in mind that one late payment among years of on-time payments is far less serious than a late payment and limited credit history.

When Is a Credit Card Payment Considered Late?

As far as credit card companies are concerned, the payment is considered late if it’s submitted after the cutoff period, which varies depending on the lender. Sometimes it’s 5 p.m. on a business day while for others it’s 8 p.m. or 11:59 p.m. Also be aware of when a late fee will be charged. Generally speaking, a late fee is issued if payment is received after the credit card issuer’s cutoff time.

30 Days Past Due

Late credit card payments usually aren’t reported to the credit bureau until after 30 days. In other words, if you make a payment after the due date but within this initial 30-day period, it won’t show up on your credit report, but you may have to pay a late fee.

60 Days Past Due

If your payment is more than 60 days late, the 30-day entry on your credit report is updated and your card’s interest rate could increase. If it increases and by how much depends on your card’s terms.

How Late Can You Be on a Car Payment?

Typically, the grace period on auto loans is 10 days, but this depends on the lender. The grace period your lender allows should be listed under the terms and conditions of your loan. This is where you’ll also find the details of the loan, including your loan balance, your interest rate, the term of the loan and the fees associated with a late or missed payment.

If you can afford to pay but simply forgot, you’ll want to pay it as soon as possible. But if you feel you can’t afford the car payment, you should get in touch with your lender and see if they would be willing to renegotiate the terms of the loan.

Deferring Car Payments

You can also look into deferring your car payment if you don’t have the funds now but you expect to later. A deferment essentially means you’re changing your due date by postponing the date of your next payment. Deferments usually don’t negatively affect your credit score.

What If I’m Late on Paying My Rent or Mortgage?

If you’re a few days late paying your rent, usually you shouldn’t have to worry about this affecting your credit score. If you know your landlord, chances are they’ll say something if you continue to submit late payments. If you’re paying a property management company, they likely won’t be as lenient on late payments. Our best advice is to pay your rent within the week it’s due.

Mortgage lenders typically report late payments to credit bureaus and usually have different grace periods. Paying within seven days should help you avoid decreasing credit scores.

One of the best ways to stay on top of your mortgage or rent payment is to set up a monthly reminder for a few days before the first of the month or, if possible, set up an automatic payment. Because your rent or mortgage payment is the same each month, it should be easy to calculate it into your personal finances.

Can a Late Credit Card Payment Made Under 30 Days Still Affect My Score?

If you make a credit card payment within the 30-day period, it generally should not be reported negatively or have any effect on your credit score. Beyond that time, however, there is a possibility your credit score could be affected. Make sure you know the terms of your credit card however, terms can vary and you don’t want any surprises.

If it turns out your late payment has been reported, know that its impact on your score generally diminishes with time, especially if it’s an isolated event. Other on-time payments can help counter the negative effects of late payments. And, as with almost any other mistake, the sooner you realize you’ve made it and try to fix it, the less likely it is to turn into a big problem.

Late Fees vs. Overdue Payments

Late fees are essentially fees charged by lenders to borrowers if a payment is received after its due date. So, if your payment is sent late—or is not the minimum payment or above—you could be charged a late fee.

Most credit card payments are due within a minimum of 21 days after the billing cycle ends, but remember, the grace period is usually only 30 days, so you’ll want to pay them off as soon as possible. Credit card late fees vary depending on your lender and requirements under the CFPB, but the late fee amount can’t be more than the minimum payment. For example, if your minimum payment is $35, your late fee won’t be higher than that.

An overdue payment, however, is a payment that was not paid by the due date. If you miss a due date, you will see the minimum balance plus the overdue payment on your next billing cycle. The overdue payment may be the full amount or a partial amount, such as if you paid part of your minimum but not all of it.

Removing Late Payments From Your Credit History

If there’s an error on your credit history, such as if a car payment is marked late but it actually wasn’t and you have proof, you can challenge it with the lender. The process involves explaining exactly what happened and asking that the error be fixed. Technically, the lender or servicer has 30 business days to respond to the error. If you don’t hear from them within about 45 days, follow up with them.

If a late payment ding on your credit report is accurate, you can still contact the lender and dispute it, especially if you’ve been diligent about paying your bills on time. The lender can provide what’s called a goodwill adjustment, which is when the lender essentially forgives your late fee.

As part of this process, you may be asked to explain the circumstances surrounding the reasons for your payment being submitted late. For example, maybe you went on vacation and forgot or you had to pay a large unexpected cost, such as medical fees, and you couldn’t afford the payment that month.

The lender may offer you a chance to enroll in automatic payments to lessen the chances of a late payment happening again.

How Long Does It Take for a Missed Payment to Come Off My Credit Report?

Unfortunately, if there’s a missed payment or a negative item on your credit history and you’re not able to have it removed, it can stay on there for seven years.

Keep in mind that if the incident occurred five years ago and you’re applying for a loan, it will have less effect than if it occurred last week. The more time that passes after the missed payment occurs, the better. Why? Because credit scores are based on recent financial behavior, so if you only miss one payment and not multiples, eventually your credit score takes your frequent on-time payments into account.

How to Prevent Late Payments in the Future

It’s hard to keep track of everything—grocery lists, kids’ schedules, work to-do lists and, of course, bill due dates—but there are ways to manage your personal finances better to ensure you never miss a payment.

  • Go paperless. Going paperless may increase the likelihood you notice when a bill comes through each month instead of being lost in piles of other mail.
  • Set up reminders. Banks sometimes offer text and email reminders that tell you when a bill, such as a car payment or credit card payment, is coming up. You can also set these up yourself to recur each month on your personal digital calendar.
  • Enroll in automatic payments. Automatic payments ensure your car payment or other loan payment is made on time. Just make sure the funds are available in your account on the day it’s due to be withdrawn to avoid potential overdraw fees.

Keep an eye on your credit report and past late payments when you sign up for Credit.com’s Credit Report Card. It gives you a letter grade in each of the five key factors of your credit.

The post How Late Can You Be on a Car Payment, Mortgage or Other Bill? appeared first on Credit.com.


Source: credit.com

Voluntary Repossession: How It Affects Your Credit

by Phillip Warren

When you get behind on your car payments, it might feel like you have no options ahead of you. If you’re anxious about having your car forcibly repossessed by the bank, there is a way…

The post Voluntary Repossession: How It Affects Your Credit appeared first on Crediful.

Giving Gift Cards This Holiday Season? Go Electronic

by Phillip Warren

A recent Bankrate report indicates that electronic gift cards are probably a better choice when you are giving to members of the younger generation.

The post Giving Gift Cards This Holiday Season? Go Electronic appeared first on Bible Money Matters and was written by Miranda Marquit. Copyright © Bible Money Matters - please visit biblemoneymatters.com for more great content.


Source: biblemoneymatters.com

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit

by Phillip Warren

When it comes to excuses consumers give for their poor credit scores, banks and lenders have heard it all. 

Maybe you lost your job and couldn’t pay your student loan payment for a few months. Or perhaps you thought you’d gotten a deferment but were too busy job hunting to find out for sure. 

Maybe you thought you paid your credit card bill but it’s actually sitting on your kitchen counter waiting for the mail.

Whatever the reason for your low credit score, one thing is for certain — lenders don’t care.

In fact, banks and other lenders lean on your credit score and other factors to determine whether they should approve you for a credit card or a loan — and that’s about it. Your personal situation is never considered, nor should it be.

It would be wonderful if credit card companies understood that “life happens” and made special exceptions to help people out, but that’s not the world we live in.  As most of us already know, that’s not typically how credit works. Credit cards are backed by banks, and banks have rules for a reason.

Now, here’s the good news: Credit cards can help rebuild your credit, earn cash back for each dollar you spend, make travel easier, and serve as an emergency fund if you’re stuck paying a huge bill at the last minute. This is true even if you have poor credit, although the selection of credit cards you can qualify for may be somewhat limited. 

Keep reading to learn about the best credit cards for bad credit, how they work, and how you can get approved.

Best Cards for Bad Credit This Year

Before you give up on building credit, you should check out all the credit cards that are available to consumers who need some help. Our list of the best credit cards for bad credit includes some of the top offers with the lowest fees and fair terms.

  • Total Visa®
  • Discover it® Secured
  • Credit One Bank® Visa® Credit Card
  • Secured Mastercard® from Capital One®
  • Milestone® Gold Mastercard®
  • Credit One Bank® Unsecured Visa® with Cash Back Rewards

#1: Total Visa®

The Total Visa® is one of the easiest credit cards to get approved for in today’s market, and it’s easy to use all over the world since it’s a true Visa credit card. However, this card does come with high rates and fees since it’s available to consumers with poor credit or a limited credit history.

Processing your application will cost $89, which is extremely high when you consider the fact that most credit cards don’t charge an application fee. You’ll also pay an initial annual fee of $75 and a $48 annual fee for each year thereafter.

Once you sign up, you’ll be able to pick your preferred card design and your credit card payments will be reported to all three credit reporting agencies — Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. This is the main benefit of this card since your on-time payments can easily help boost your credit score over time. 

For the most part, the Total Visa® is best for consumers who don’t mind paying a few fees to access an unsecured line of credit. Since this card doesn’t dole out rewards, however, there are few cardholder perks to look forward to. 

  • APR: 35.99% APR
  • Fees: Application fee and annual fee
  • Minimum Credit Score: Not specified
  • Rewards: No

#2: Discover it® Secured

While secured cards don’t offer an unsecured line of credit like unsecured credit cards do, they are extremely easy to qualify for. The Discover it® Secured may not be ideal for everyone, but it does offer a simple online application process and the ability to get approved with little to no credit history.

Keep in mind, however, that secured cards do work differently than traditional credit cards. With a secured credit card, you’re required to put down a cash deposit upfront as collateral. However, you will get your cash deposit back when you close your account in good standing.

Amazingly, the Discover it® Secured lets you earn rewards with no annual fee. You’ll start by earning 2% back on up to $1,000 spent each quarter in dining and gas. You’ll also earn an unlimited 1% back on everything else you buy.

The Discover it® Secured doesn’t charge an application fee or an annual fee, although you’ll need to come up with the cash for your initial deposit upfront. For the most part, this card is best for consumers who have little to no credit and want to build their credit history while earning rewards.

  • APR: 24.74%
  • Fees: No annual fee or monthly fees
  • Minimum Credit Score: Not specified
  • Rewards: Yes

#3: Credit One Bank® Visa® Credit Card

The Credit One Bank® Visa® Credit Card is another credit card for bad credit that lets you earn rewards on your everyday spending. You’ll earn a flat 1% cash back for every dollar you spend with this credit card, and since it’s unsecured, you don’t have to put down a cash deposit to get started.

Other benefits include the fact you can get pre-qualified for this card online without a hard inquiry on your credit report — and that you get a free copy of your Experian credit score on your online account management page.

You may be required to pay an annual fee up to $95 for this card for the first year, but it depends on your creditworthiness. After that, your annual fee could be between $0 and $99.

  • APR: 19.99% to 25.99%
  • Fees: Annual fee up to $95 the first year depending on creditworthiness; after that $0 to $99
  • Minimum Credit Score: Not specified
  • Rewards: Yes

#4: Secured Mastercard® from Capital One®

The Secured Mastercard® from Capital One® is another secured credit card that extends a line of credit to consumers who can put down a cash deposit as collateral. This card is geared to people with bad credit or no credit history, so it’s easy to get approved for. One downside, however, is that your initial line of credit will likely be just $200 — and that doesn’t give you much to work with. 

On the upside, this card doesn’t charge an annual fee or any application fees. That makes it a good option if you don’t want to pay any fees you won’t get back.

You’ll also get access to 24/7 customer service, $0 fraud liability, and other cardholder perks.

  • APR: 26.49%
  • Fees: No ongoing fees
  • Minimum Credit Score: Not specified
  • Rewards: No

#5: Milestone® Gold Mastercard®

The Milestone® Gold Mastercard® is an unsecured credit card that lets you get pre-qualified online without a hard inquiry on your credit report. You won’t earn any rewards on your purchases, but you do get benefits like the ability to select your card’s design, chip and pin technology, and easy online account access.

You will have to pay a one-time fee of $25 to open your account, and there’s an annual fee of $50 the first year and $99 for each year after that.

  • APR: 24.90%
  • Fees: Account opening fee and annual fees
  • Minimum Credit Score: Not specified
  • Rewards: No

#6: Credit One Bank® Unsecured Visa® with Cash Back Rewards

The Credit One Bank® Unsecured Visa® with Cash Back Rewards lets you earn 1% back on every purchase you make with no limits or exclusions. There’s no annual fee or application fee either, which makes this card a winner for consumers who don’t want to get hit with a lot of out-of-pocket costs.

As a cardholder, you’ll get free access to your Experian credit score, zero fraud liability, and access to a mobile app that makes tracking your purchases and rewards a breeze. You can also get pre-qualified online without a hard inquiry on your credit report.

  • APR: 25.99%
  • Fees: No annual fee or application fee
  • Minimum Credit Score: Not specified
  • Rewards: Yes

The Downside of Credit Cards with Bad Credit

While your odds of getting approved for one of the credit cards for bad credit listed above are high, you should be aware that there are plenty of pitfalls to be aware of. Here are the major downsides you’ll find with these credit cards for bad credit and others comparable cards:

  • Higher fees: While someone with excellent credit can shop around for credit cards without any fees, this isn’t the case of you have bad credit. If your credit score is poor or you have a thin credit profile, you should expect to pay higher fees and more of them.
  • Higher interest rates: While some credit cards come with 0% interest for a limited time or lower interest rates overall, consumers with poor credit typically have to pay the highest interest rates available today. Some credit cards for bad credit even come with APRs as high as 35%.
  • No perks: Looking for cardholder benefits like cash back on purchases or points toward airfare or movie tickets? You’ll need to wait until your credit score climbs back into “good” or “great” territory. Even if you can find a card for applicants with bad credit that offers cash back, your rewards may not make up for the higher fees.
  • No balance transfers: If you’re looking for relief from other out-of-control credit card balances, look elsewhere. Credit cards for bad credit typically don’t offer balance transfers. If they do, the terms make them cost-prohibitive.
  • Low credit limits: Credit cards for bad credit tend to offer initial credit limits in the $300 to $500 range with the possibility of increasing to $2,000 after a year of on-time monthly payments. If you need to borrow a lot more than that, you’ll have to consider other options.
  • Security deposit requirement: Secured credit cards require you to put down a cash deposit to secure your line of credit. While this shouldn’t necessarily be a deal-breaker — and it may be required if you can’t get approved for an unsecured credit card — you’ll need to come up with a few hundred dollars before you apply.
  • Checking account requirement: Most new credit card accounts now require cardholders to pay bills online, which means you’ll need a checking account. If you’re mostly “unbanked,” you may need to open a traditional bank account before you apply.

Benefits of Improving Your Credit Score

People with bad credit often consider their personal finances a lost cause. The road to better credit can seem long and stressful, and it’s sometimes easier to give up then it is to try to fix credit mistakes you’ve made in the past.

But, there are some real advantages that come with having at least “good” credit, which typically means any FICO score of 670 or above. Here are some of the real-life benefits better credit can mean for your life and your lifestyle:

  • Higher credit limits: The higher your credit score goes, the more money banks are typically willing to lend. With good credit, you’ll have a better chance at qualifying for a car loan, taking out a personal loan, or getting a credit card with a reasonable limit.
  • Lower interest rates: A higher credit score tells lenders you’re not as risky as a borrower —a sign that typically translates into lower interest rates. When you pay a lower APR each time you borrow, you can save huge amounts of money on interest over time.
  • Lower payments: Borrowing money with a lower interest rate typically means you can usually get lower payments all your loans, including a home loan or a car loan.
  • Ability to shop around: When you’re an ideal candidate for a loan, you can shop around to get the best deals on credit cards, mortgages, personal loans, and more.
  • Ability to help others: If your kid wants to buy a car but doesn’t have any credit history, better credit puts you in the position to help him or her out. If your credit is poor, you won’t be in the position to help anyone.
  • More options in life: Your credit score can also impact your ability to open a bank account or rent a new apartment. Since employers can request to see a modified version of your credit report before they hire you, excellent credit can also give you a leg up when it comes to beating out other candidates for a job. 

In addition to the benefits listed above, most insurance companies now consider your credit score when you apply for coverage. For that reason, life, auto, and home insurance rates tend to be lower for people with higher credit scores.

This may seem unfair, but you have to remember that research has shown people with high credit scores tend to file fewer insurance claims.

How to Improve Your Credit: Slow and Steady

When you have a low credit score, there are two ways to handle it. If you don’t mind the consequences of poor credit enough to do anything about it, you can wait a decade until the bad marks age off your credit report. Depending on when your creditors give up and write off your debt, you may not even need to wait that long.

If you don’t like the idea of letting your credit decay while you wait it out, you can also try to fix your past credit mistakes. This typically means paying off debt — and especially delinquent debts — but it can also mean applying for new loan products that are geared to people who need to repair their credit.

If you decide to take actionable steps to build credit fast, the credit cards on this page can help. They’ll give you an opportunity to show the credit bureaus that you’ve changed your ways.

Before you take steps to improve your credit score, however, keep in mind all the different factors used to determine your standing in the first place. The FICO scoring method considers the following factors when assigning your score:

  • On-time payments: Paying all your bills on time, including credit cards, makes up 35% of your FICO score. For that reason, paying all your bills early or on time is absolutely essential.
  • Outstanding debts: How much you owe matters, which is why paying off your credit cards each month or as often as possible helps your score. According to myFICO.com, the amounts you owe in relation to your credit limits make up another 30% of your FICO score.
  • New credit: Apply for too many new cards or accounts at once can impact your score in a negative way. In fact, this determinant makes up another 10% of your FICO score.
  • Credit mix: Having a variety of open accounts impresses the credit bureau algorithm Gods. If all you have are personal loans right now, mixing in a credit card can help. If you already have four or five credit cards, it may be wise to back off a little.
  • Length of credit history: The length of your credit history also plays a role in your score. The longer your credit history, the better off you are.

If you want to improve your credit score, consider all the factors above and how you can change your behavior to score higher in each category. It’s pretty easy to see how paying all your bills early or on time and paying off debt could make a big positive impact on your credit score when you consider that these two factors alone make up 65% of your FICO score.

If you want a way to track your progress, also look into an app like Credit Karma, one of my favorite tools. This app lets you monitor your credit progress over time and even receive notifications when your score has changed. Best of all, it’s free.

Should You Use a Credit Card to Rebuild Your Credit Score?

If you’re on the fence about picking up a credit card for bad credit, your first step should be thinking over your goals. What exactly are you trying to accomplish?

If you’re looking for spending power, the cards on this list probably won’t help. Some are secured cards, meaning you need a cash deposit to put down as collateral. Others offer low credit limits and high fees and interest rates, making them costly to use over the long-term.

If you really want to start over from scratch and repair credit mistakes made in the past, on the other hand, one of these cards may be exactly what you need. If you’re determined to improve your score, they can speed things along.

You may pay higher fees and interest rates along the way, but it’s important to remember that none of the cards on this list need to be your top card forever. Ideally, you’ll use a credit card for poor credit to rebuild your credit and boost your score. Once you’ve reached your goal, you can upgrade to a new card with better benefits and terms.

The post Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.


Source: goodfinancialcents.com

How Long Does It Take To Get a Credit Card?

by Phillip Warren

Generally speaking, it takes seven to 10 business days to get a credit card once you’re approved. The specific amount of time can vary as many factors throughout the process affect how fast you receive your card. Getting approved can happen in a matter of seconds or days, depending on what kind of card you apply for. Whether you apply online or in person may also affect how fast you’ll receive your credit card in the mail.

How Long Does It Take to Get My Card in the Mail?

The longest step in getting a credit card is waiting for it to come in the mail. Shipping time frames can vary depending on which credit card you apply for. Here are the average time frames of many popular credit card companies today:

  • American Express: seven to 10 business days
  • Wells Fargo: seven to 10 business days
  • Discover: three to five business days
  • Capital One: seven to 10 business days
  • Bank of America: seven to 10 business days
  • Chase: three to 5 business days
  • Citi: seven to 10 business days

Unfortunately, the time it takes for the credit card to go through the mail can be impacted by many factors out of your control. You may get your card sooner than stated above, or later if there are external mail carrier issues.

How to Get a Credit Card Right Away

Unfortunately, most credit cards aren’t made available to you the same day you apply. Even though you can get approved for a card almost instantly, you must still wait for the card to come in the mail. However, credit card companies sometimes offer options to help speed up the process.

Most banks offer expedited shipping if you need your card delivered faster than usual. Depending on what type of card and bank you apply with, they may charge you an extra fee for this option. Some banks will make things easier for you by giving you your credit card number right after approval. This allows you to start making purchases while waiting for the physical card to arrive. American Express typically allows this with all of their cards to increase their user satisfaction.

What to Do If You Haven’t Received Your Card Yet

If you notice that you haven’t received your card after some time, reach out to your bank or credit card company. By reaching out, you minimize the risk of the card getting lost or stolen. Your bank may also be able to provide you with a temporary card while they sort everything out. Not all lenders, but if they do they may charge you an additional fee.

How To Apply for a Credit Card

To get a credit card, you must first apply either online or in person for approval. Receiving the credit card itself and waiting to be approved are two separate steps. Therefore, the time it takes to receive your card can vary from person to person.

What Do Creditors Look for in Applications?

Credit card applications typically ask for your personal information as well as your financial background. To determine your financial background, they’ll ask for your Social Security number and source of income.

Your Social Security number will allow the creditors access to your credit report. After close evaluation, you’ll either be approved or declined for the card. When looking at your report, creditors typically pay close attention to data such as your debt-to-income ratio, hard inquiries, and any delinquent accounts you may have.

What Do Creditors Look for In a Credit Report?

Your debt-to-income ratio refers to how much of your card’s limit is spent. Consistently using too much of your limit may cause creditors to view you as more of a high-risk borrower. Similarly, too many hard inquiries can make you seem risky. Finally, a delinquent account is another red flag. This shows that you may not have been paying off your credit card bills on time. Lenders won’t be as willing to approve you for a credit card if you have a history of account delinquency, as it’s not a good sign for them that you’ll be a reliable borrower.

Some credit card companies pre-approve users who they think may be a good fit based on a soft version of their credit report. A soft version of your report gives lenders a glimpse of your financial background, but won’t affect your credit score. When your report shows that you meet a few requirements, they’ll send a card in the mail for you to use if you apply. Receiving the card in the mail doesn’t mean that you are automatically approved. It just helps speed up the process of getting a credit card. Pre-approving users is a way companies market their cards to users, in hopes of them applying later on.

How to Build Credit With a Credit Card

When you use a credit card, you build credit simultaneously. The way you manage and use your card can have either a positive or negative effect on your credit score.

How Long Does It Take to Build Credit?

If this is your first time using a credit card, then you are most likely building credit from scratch. Building a credit score doesn’t happen overnight. It usually takes about six months or so to build enough credit to have a credit report. Beginning early can be of great benefit to you down the line. A major factor in the calculation of your credit score is the length of your credit history. The longer you’ve spent building your credit, the more of a positive impact it can have on your score.

Ways to Keep Your Credit Score Healthy

When using a credit card, it can pay off in the long run to follow some best practices. You can do this by having a good understanding of what exactly factors into your credit score. The following are good habits to establish for maintaining a healthy score:

  • Make on-time payments to avoid a delinquent account.
  • Aim to only use 30 percent of your credit limit at a time to show you can manage your card wisely.
  • Avoid applying to too many cards or loans in a short time, as it can result in a hard inquiry. Too many hard inquiries can be the reason you are getting declined for your financial requests.
  • Stay on top of monitoring your credit score and report, so you can identify any mistakes before it’s too late to fix.

Buildig Credit Best Practices

While the most common time frame for getting a credit card is seven to 10 days, it can vary from person to person. If this seems like a long time, try reaching out to your bank. They may be able to expedite shipping or give you access to your credit card number in advance. Each credit card lender is different, so it’s important to do your research before applying. Take a look at our guide on the best credit card offers to help start your search.

The post How Long Does It Take To Get a Credit Card? appeared first on MintLife Blog.


Source: mint.intuit.com

Repossession Credit Scores: What You Need to Know

by Phillip Warren

One of the harsh truths of secured loans is that your asset can be repossessed if you fail to make the payments. In the words of the FTC, “your consumer rights may be limited” if you miss your monthly payments, and when that happens, both your financial situation and your bank balance will take a hit.

On this guide, we’ll look at what can happen when you fall behind on your car payments, and how much damage it can do to your credit score.

What is a Car Repossession?

An auto loan is a loan acquired for the sole purpose of purchasing a car. The lender covers the cost of the car, you get the vehicle you want, and in return you pay a fixed monthly sum until the loan balance is repaid.

If you fail to make to make a payment or you’re late, the lender may assume possession of your car and sell it to offset the losses. At the same time, they will report your missed and late payments to the main credit bureaus, and your credit score will take a hit. What’s more, if the sale is not enough to cover the remainder of the debt, you may be asked to pay the residual balance.

The same process applies to a title loan, whereby your car is used as collateral for a loan but isn’t actually the purpose of the loan.

To avoid repossession, you need to make your car payments on time every month. If you are late or make a partial payment, you may incur penalties and it’s possible that your credit score will suffer as well. If you continue to delay payment, the lender will seek to cover their costs as quickly and painlessly as possible.

How a Repossession Can Impact Your Credit Score

Car repossession can impact your credit history and credit score in several ways. Firstly, all missed and late car payments will be reported to the credit bureaus and will remain on your account for up to 7 years. They can also reduce your credit score. 

Secondly, if your car is repossessed on top of late payments, you could lose up to 100 points from your credit score, significantly reducing your chances of being accepted for a credit card, loan or mortgage in the future. 

And that’s not the end of it. If you have had your car for less than a couple of years, there’s a good chance the sale price will be much less than the loan balance. Car repossession doesn’t wipe the slate clean and could still leave you with a sizable issue. If you have a $10,000 balance and the car is sold for $5,000, you will owe $5,000 on the loan and the lender may also hit you with towing charges.

Don’t assume that the car is worth more than the value of the loan and that everything will be okay. The lender isn’t selling it direct; they won’t get the best price. Repossessed vehicles are sold cheaply, often for much less than their value, and in most cases, a balance remains. 

Lenders may be lenient with this balance as it’s not secured, so their options are limited. However, they can also file a judgment or sell it to a collection agency, at which point your problems increase and your credit score drops even further.

How Does a Repo Take Place?

If you have a substantial credit card debt and miss a payment, your creditor will typically take it easy on you. They can’t legally report the missed payment until at least 30-days have passed and most creditors won’t sell the account to a collection agency until it is at least 180-days overdue.

This leads many borrowers into a false sense of security, believing that an auto loan lender will be just as forgiving. But this is simply not true. Some lenders will repo your car just 90-days after your last payment, others will do it after 60 days. They don’t make as many allowances because they don’t need to—they can simply seize your asset, get most of the money back, and then chase the rest as needed.

Most repossessions happen quickly and with little warning. The lender will contact you beforehand and request that you pay what you owe, but the actual repo process doesn’t work quite like what you may have seen on TV. 

They’re not allowed to break down your door or threaten you; they’re not allowed to use force. And, most of the time, they don’t need to. If they see your car, they will load it onto their truck and disappear. They’re so used to this process that they can typically do it in less than 60-seconds.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re at home or at work—you just lost your ride.

What Can You Do Before a Repo Hits Your Credit Score?

Fortunately, there are ways to avoid the repo process and escape the damage. You just need to act quickly and don’t bury your head in the sand, as many borrowers do.

Request a Deferment

An auto loan lender won’t waste as much time as a creditor, simply because they don’t need to. However, they still understand that they won’t get top dollar for the car and are generally happy to make a few allowances if it means you have more chance of meeting your payments.

If you sense that your financial situation is on the decline, contact your lender and request a deferment. This should be done as soon as possible, preferably before you miss a payment.

A deferment buys you a little extra time, allowing you to take the next month or two off and adding these payments onto the end of the term. The FTC recommends that you get any agreement in writing, just in case they renege on their promise.

Refinance

One of the best ways to avoid car repossession, is to refinance your loan and secure more favorable terms. The balance may increase, and you’ll likely find yourself paying more interest over the long-term, but in the short-term, you’ll have smaller monthly payments to contend with and this makes the loan more manageable.

You will need a good credit score for this to work (although there are some bad credit lenders) but it will allow you to tweak the terms in your favor and potentially improve your credit situation.

Sell the Car Yourself

Desperate times call for desperate measures; if you’re on the brink of facing repossession, you should consider selling the car yourself. You’ll likely get more than your lender would and you can use this to clear the balance. 

Before you sell, calculate how much is left and make sure the sale will cover it. If not, you will need to find the additional funds yourself, preferably without acquiring additional debt. Ask friends or family members if they can help you out.

How Long a Repo Can Affect Your Credit Score

The damage caused by a repossession can remain on your credit score for 7 years, causing some financial difficulty. However, the damage will lessen over time and within three or four years it will be negligible at best.

Derogatory marks cease to have an impact on your credit score a long time before it disappears off your credit report, and it’s the same for late payments and repossessions.

Still, that doesn’t mean you should take things lightly. The lender can make life very difficult for you if you don’t meet your payments every month and don’t work with them to find a solution.

What About Voluntary Repossession?

If you’re missing payments because you’ve lost your job or suffered a major change in your financial circumstances, it may be time to consider voluntary repossession, in which case there are no missed payments and you don’t need to worry about repo men knocking on your door or coming to your workplace.

With voluntary repossession, the borrower contacts the lender, informs them they can no longer afford the payments, and arranges a time and a place to return the car. However, while this is a better option, it can do similar damage to the borrower’s credit score as a voluntary repossession, like a traditional repossession, is still a defaulted loan.

Missed payments aside, the only difference concerns how the repossession shows on the borrower’s credit report. Voluntary repossession will look better to a creditor who manually scans the report, but the majority of lenders run automatic checks and won’t notice a difference.

Summary: Act Quickly


If you have student loan, credit card, and other unsecured debt, a repo could reduce your chances of a successful debt payoff and potentially prevent you from getting a mortgage. But it’s not the end of the world. You can get a deferment, refinance or reinstate the loan, and even if the worst does happen, it may only take a year or so to get back on track after you fix your financial woes.

Repossession Credit Scores: What You Need to Know is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.


Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Still Waiting on Your Second Stimulus Check? Here’s How to Track It

by Phillip Warren

The second stimulus check started hitting bank accounts last week.

That means many people who have direct deposit are waking up to find an extra $600 in their bank accounts if they’re single or $1,200 if they’re married, plus a $600 coronavirus credit for each dependent child 16 or younger.

But what if your second check hasn’t arrived? There’s a new way to find out when it’s coming.

Where’s My Second Stimulus Check?

The IRS released an updated version of the Get My Payment application on its website Monday, Jan. 4, that allows you to track your second stimulus check. You can use it on your computer, phone or tablet.

Here’s all of our coverage of the coronavirus outbreak, which we will be updating every day.

Click on the link, and then click the blue “Get My Payment” button. Don’t be surprised if you have to wait a couple minutes to get through. This corner of IRS.gov is getting a lot of traffic right now, because people really want to know when they’re getting their $600 stimulus check. When you do get through, you’ll get a warning that the system is for authorized use only. Click “OK.”

Next you’ll need to enter your Social Security number or Individual Tax ID number, date of birth, street address and ZIP code.

Once you submit your information, the website will tell you the date your payment is scheduled to be made and whether it will be by check or direct deposit. If it’s scheduled for direct deposit, it will tell you the last four numbers of the bank account it will be deposited into.

You can also use the tool to provide your bank account and routing numbers. If the IRS can’t pay you via direct deposit, you’ll get one via paper check or prepaid debit card. The first paper checks were sent last Wednesday, Dec. 30.

What if Something Is Wrong With My Payment?

What if you haven’t gotten the payment that should have been deposited already? Or what if your payment isn’t scheduled, or the wrong amount has been deposited? Check this FAQ page, but don’t bother trying to call the IRS right now.

If your payment hasn’t been made by Jan. 15, you’ll need to submit a tax return and get it in the form of a rebate recovery credit. The same applies if you were eligible for the first round of checks but didn’t received one, or if you got the wrong amount.

Payment status not available? Here’s what that means, plus a few hacks that worked in the first round.

Your coronavirus stimulus check is not taxable — so however you plan to spend that money, just know that you don’t need to save any of it for Uncle Sam.

Robin Hartill is a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder and a certified financial planner. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to DearPenny@thepennyhoarder.com.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.


Source: thepennyhoarder.com